Tuesday, August 7, 2018

New Work: Forest Sequence I, oil on canvas 48 x 120 inches

Forest Sequence I, oil on  two, 48 x 60 inch canvases, total size, 48 x 120 inches

Sometimes you just want to go bigger with an idea. With this oil and the 10' expanse, I was able to create an expressive forest view where all is simplified and surrounded in a soft, colored atmosphere. 

Care was taken to keep a limited color selection and also to subtly move the color across the canvas from left to right. There is a lot of atmosphere here and it becomes more obvious when the foliage is reduced on the right side. As the oil developed, I became more aware of the lateral possibilities and seeing back into the forest. 

It became a painting of nuances, a sweeping view of trees plainly seen and many others receding into the background. It was a joy to watch this come to life on the canvas.

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Grateful Notices: Light Diffusing Oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches

Light Diffusing   Oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches
private collection
Exhibited: Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM

I started this oil while I was doing private lessons. The idea being presented was to grey down all of the colors and create a sunlit piece without the need for saturated colors and bright effects. Parts of the painting still appear to be bright but it's a nice illusion. The brighter colors are in reserve - they are not used here, but more vibrancy could have been brought in if needed.

Since the colors are not a full strength, it allows for the delicate purples and blue-greens to play a prominent role here and there, breaking up the line of trees and making this part of the forest more interesting. It's a good strategy for making every color count and creating a softer mood.

The composition went through numerous changes, simplifying each time with the end result being a painting equally focused on color and composition.

My thanks to the collectors that purchased this work. It's always an honor.


Article and Video: Did a Deceased Couple Steal a de Kooning and Get Away With It?


Here's a very interesting headline from the Washington Post, August 3, 2018 by Antonia Farzan.  This is an excerpt, so check out the full Washington Post story here and scroll down to see the video documentary.


A small-town couple left behind a stolen painting worth over $100 million — and a big mystery


Woman-Ochre” by Willem de Kooning.
(Courtesy of University of Arizona Museum of Art)
More than 30 years ago, that same painting disappeared the day after Thanksgiving from the University of Arizona Museum of Art in Tucson
Jerry and Rita Alter kept to themselves. They were a lovely couple, neighbors in the small New Mexico town of Cliff would later tell reporters. But no one knew much about them.

They may have been hiding a decades-old secret, pieces of which are now just emerging.

Among them:

After the couple died, a stolen Willem de Kooning painting with an estimated worth of $160 million was discovered in their bedroom.

More than 30 years ago, that same painting disappeared the day after Thanksgiving from the University of Arizona Museum of Art in Tucson.

And Wednesday, the Arizona Republic reported that a family photo had surfaced, showing that the day before the painting vanished, the couple was, in fact, in Tucson.

The next morning, a man and a woman would walk into the museum and then leave 15 minutes later. A security guard had unlocked the museum’s front door to let a staff member into the lobby, curator Olivia Miller told NPR. The couple followed. Since the museum was about to open for the day, the guard let them in.

The man walked up to the museum’s second floor while the woman struck up a conversation with the guard. A few minutes later, he came back downstairs, and the two abruptly left, according to the NPR interview and other media reports.

Sensing that something wasn’t right, the guard walked upstairs. There, he saw an empty frame where de Kooning’s “Woman-Ochre” had hung.

At the time, the museum had no surveillance cameras. Police found no fingerprints. One witness described seeing a rust-color sports car drive away but didn’t get the license plate number. For 31 years, the frame remained empty.

In 2012, Jerry Alter passed away. His widow, Rita Alter, died five years later at 81.

After their deaths, the painting was returned to the museum. The FBI is investigating the theft.

Did the quiet couple who lived in a three-bedroom ranch on Mesa Road steal “Woman-Ochre” and get away with it?

Something else doesn’t add up. Jerry and Rita Alter worked in public schools for most of their careers. Yet they somehow managed to travel to 140 countries and all seven continents, documenting their trips with tens of thousands of photos.


Also included in the Post article is this documentary from WFAA, Dallas


And yet, when they died, they had more than a million dollars in their bank account, according to the Sun News.

“I guess I figured they were very frugal,” their nephew, Ron Roseman, told WFAA.

Roseman couldn’t be reached for comment on Thursday evening. But not long after “Woman — Ochre” resurfaced, he told ABC13 that he couldn’t imagine that his aunt and uncle had stolen the painting.

“They were just nice people,” he said.


Read the rest of this Washington Post story here


Sunday, July 22, 2018

Grateful Notices: Red Progressions, oil on canvas, 48 x 72 inches

Red Progressions, oil on canvas, 48 x 72 inches
Purchased from Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art  Santa Fe, NMPrivate collection, Dallas, TX

3 minute video of this work with Ken narrating


I want to express my gratitude to the collector the purchased this work and to Dominique Boisjoli, my dealer and wonderful supporter in Santa Fe, NM.


About this oil:
My first desire when beginning this oil was to create a forest scene that didn't have a high finish. That is, the brushstrokes and even the physical surface of the oil would be rough. Forests are not even, polished places and I wanted this large oil to convey a bit of that experience.

In the first session when I applied all the variations of reds and oranges, it wasn't satisfactory to me. The plan was to put in a lot of complexity right away, creating variables in color but sticking to the idea of a single sweep of red trees and make it believable. I did that, and I was underwhelmed.

Peeking above the trees was an outline of far blue hills and it was lacking as well. I was too predictable. Everyday is not a happy one in the studio, but I did step up and block in a 4 x 6 foot oil, a worthy accomplishment, so I left it at that.

Looking back, what did I expect? That I would have created a really nice oil in one session?

In the second session I came back fresh and simply thought about what the painting needed: Contrast.

Once the dark tree trunks went in, the painting came to life. The background colors began to sing and suddenly the painting was calling out for improvements in a number of places. I drastically cut back the amount of the blue hill that was visible and in turn, it gave the trees more prominence.

Over the next few sessions, it was a pleasure to attend to those needs and take the oil to new places. A number of 'mistakes' were made - attempts that hit a dead end, but those moves opened up new opportunities for other, better solutions.

It all came down to making a good start and continuing forward in a way that would not diminish the power and spontaneity that existed at the beginning. I was committed to this single line of trees without gaps or interruptions. This idea created a series of  difficult problems across a 6 foot surface, so a lot of small strategies came into play.

A considerable number of changes were made along the way but always with the idea of creating a large and compelling forest presence that is interesting across the entire canvas.

Monday, July 9, 2018

Video: Dramatic Skies video by Randy Halverson




I love skies and Randy Halverson made a great video that is a must-see.
Ken

Dakotalapse  View on Vimeo

Breathtaking video with views of the skies over South Dakota and Wyoming, by Randy Halverson (3’30”)

From Randy:
Dakotalapse 8K is a compilation of new timelapse I have shot in the last 2 years. It was shot in South Dakota and Wyoming and the first footage I have posted online in 8K.

8K resolution on Youtube

Badlands Night Sky Workshops - Join me this June in the Badlands of SD and learn how to shoot stills and astro timelapse.

Watch for a shot of "Steve" Aurora at 1:52

Available in 8K resolution for licensing.

The timelapse was shot with Sony AR7II, Canon 5DSR and Nikon D810. The D810 isn't quite 8K native, but I think those shots still turned out better than the 5DSR night shots, which are much larger stills.

Photography and Editing – Randy Halverson
Produced by Randy Halverson – Dakotalapse, LLC
Opening Dakotalapse graphics – Luke Arens
Music Epic Cinematic by Eric Dillen, licensed through Audiojungle.net

Thanks to Cheyenne Camping Center for the great deals on the travel trailers you see in a few of the shots. cheyennecampingcenter.com

Contact for licensing footage, shooting rates or anything else.
Randy Halverson
dakotalapse@gmail.com

Follow:
Facebook facebook.com/dakotalapse
Instagram instagram.com/dakotalapse

Monday, July 2, 2018

New Work: Saccades XI, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches

Saccades XI, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches  $7550 framed
Exhibiting:  Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art

The Saccades Series is something I invented for myself. It is a way to use the randomness of the forest to create abstracted patterns and color combinations without limits. Each one presents a number of problems and opportunities that I haven't encounterd before and that's the point. Saccades is an optical term that describes a condition where the eye can't rest on a particular spot.


In this case, there is that obvious blue trunk in the foreground, but it's not enough to create a real  focus. The colors are arrayed in subtle ways and the light source is diffused, creating the overall effect of that soft yellow-green light enveloping everything in the background.

The color palette shifted on this one numerous times but I did want the blue to be somewhat predominant. The light changed as well, from a darker, grayer forest to one with a more intense light coming through, but that was discarded as well.

It is often said that the painting will tell you want it wants and over a series of painting sessions with this one, I was getting an earful. The oil and I opted for the soft poetry of a forest with the soft light nearby.


Sunday, July 1, 2018

New Work: Soft Forest Blues, oil on canvas 40 x 40 inches

Soft Forest Blues, oil on canvas 40 x 40 inches   $7550.
Exhibiting:  Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art

The goal here was to do a forest with blues woven into the composition. I wanted something subtle without the blues being primary. It's easy to use blues to make trees but it's difficult to make them believable.

All of the colors are greyed down, even the darks and lights, allowing the different blues to gently glow in the background. The numerous trunks and branches create a lot of complexity, all to create a veil for the blue hues. The line of trees is bordered with that bit of sky and the muted orange below, a bit of reality to bring it all together.

Finally, the foreground was muted even more, allowing the other subtleties in the painting a chance to be noticed.

Monday, June 25, 2018

New Work: Yellows on a Still Lake, oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches

Yellows on a Still Lake, oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches  $8480 framed
Exhibiting:  Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art

It's all about the yellows here and everything in this canvas is there to support the effect.

Being an artist is akin to being a movie director because you get to set the scene just the way you want. The yellow trees are a prime example because the light source is not exactly specified. Since it's all about the yellows, I opted out of that concern. It's entirely possible that the light can shine on the stand of trees this way or it may be that the trees are somehow generating light on their own. Either way, it is still just about those luminescent, yellow trees.

All of the glow is in the trees, not in the sky or back hill and even the yellow reflection is a bit more subdued. Everything is supporting that etherial, yellow light by being darker or a different color. Can you make a yellow glow on it's own? That would be very difficult, but it you use a number of supporting colors, tones and shapes then you have a chance. I reordered all of those elements about a dozen times before this final, glowing effect emerged.

I began this oil over the top of a previous one I had given up on and it felt GREAT to paint it out with this new start. Since the previous painting had more design elements and apparently more ways to fail, I decided to try a simpler idea for this one, something with a singular theme, like it's all about.....

That was a very helpful strategy and it was a pleasure to work through this one. Now I'm back to the studio where there are seven more oils in progress, patiently waiting. I'll shelve the yellow paints for a bit and explore some other colorful schemes.

Monday, June 18, 2018

Grateful Notices: Yellow with Reds Insisting, oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches

Yellow with Reds Insisting
Oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches   Private collection, Ohio
Exhibited: Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art

This oil was started during an art workshop I held in Alaska. I have a lot of fond memories of the people and my time there.

With this work I was demonstrating a loose approach to paint application, creating an interesting composition and using color dramatically. Obviously, I have worked this motif many times but for this one I first wanted the grasses to have a soft texture and happily, that happened right away.

In the first session the reds and yellows were very bright. It seemed fine at the time but in the early morning when I saw the painting again, my realization was that the colors were off. The intention was for the brightest yellows to be in the trees but that wasn't working. So what to do?

Later when the class assembled, I went over what was discussed the day before and one of the topics was the use of grays. Since I liked the yellows as they were, another color was ruled out. With everyone waiting around for me to do something, I added a bit of grey to a bright orange and went right into the wet, yellow paint on the left and to my delight, the toned down yellows revealed a few of the original, brighter yellows in the back. The leaves still appeared to be yellow, just toned down.

That went well so I got another brush, loaded it up with a medium grey and added it to the bright yellow leaves on the right. The paint was still very wet and the application of grey turned the leaves to an interesting green, again revealing some of the untouched, brighter yellow from the day before.

With the further addition of a medium dark and lighter lime greens at the top, the oil now had a nice balance and was far more interesting. It was almost magical how quickly it all came together by using a color that wasn't intuitive, a simple, medium grey. It was a good day in the classroom.

The gallery told me today that a very nice couple had purchased this oil to commemorate their 50 wedding anniversary. I am much honored and my congratulations and thanks go out to you both!



Monday, June 11, 2018

Grateful Notices: Sunset Pond, pastel, 9 x 12 inches

Sunset Pond, pastel, 9 x 12 inches  Private collection
Exhibited: Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art

I had the wonderful pleasure of visiting a friend on a lake. She had a paddleboat that came with two great incentives: the view and a Starbucks on an opposite shore. A lot of time was spent on the paddleboat and one of the lake photos yielded this sunset view.

This pastel was a delight to do. My intention was to keep it really simple and the center of the pastel reflects just that. OK, so I added a bit more detail to the clouds but then it changed everything. Now the edges of the scene called out for more detail as well. Adding foliage to the sides was very helpful but the center as it was originally done was now lacking something. If you change a thing in one place then it often requires adjustments elsewhere.

I realized I had the perfect opening in the center part of the view to heap more color on the band of trees. I put in a variety of colors as an atmospheric glow... that worked out nicely.

The work could still take more. Go farther! So I aded the bright yellows to punch up the sky and the glowing, blue counterpoint to further accentuate the water,

With just a few additional moves, it all came to life in a way I never imagined.


Monday, June 4, 2018

New Work: Last Colors, pastel, 12 x 18 inches

Last Colors, pastel, 12 x 18 inches  $1350 framed
Exhibiting: Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art

This is all about a singular color and how to keep it interesting. I don't typically work monochromatically but the idea was to catch the greens lit up by a setting sun.

Everything was kept a bit rough at the edges so that the extra detail would add to the complexity. As the pastel progressed, the contrasting colors away from the sun looked best as red-browns and blue-greens. The harmonies were kept tight by using a minimum about of brights and darks.

I'm thinking all the pieces worked together successfully because my eye keeps circling around the pastel, taking it all in.



Thursday, May 24, 2018

Grateful Notices: Orange and Red Woods, oil on canvas 36 x 48

Orange and Red Woods, oil on canvas 36 x 48
This oil has always been a favorite and I was thrilled to get the call from Dominique at the Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM letting me know that collectors in Boston had purchased it.

Looking back at it now, I am happy with the depth, directness and wide variations of color. I recall the juggling of all of those colors, insisting on so many and trying to find the key to get them to all work together.

Turns out the answer wasn't intuitive. It took one more color to make it happen, the dark and light aquas. It was an "Ah Ha" moment that brought out the maximum effects of the yellows and reds.

My Grateful thanks!

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Grateful Notices: Brightly Lit Woods, pastel 22 x 22 inches

Brightly Lit Woods, pastel 22 x 22 inches
Purchased from Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM
This work started out as a drawing of a wood with a stark, evening light bathing everything. I was going to fill it in with full foliage but as the drawing progressed, the simplicity prevailed. I put it aside for a very long time - it could have been a year because of the power of it and my lack of any idea to make it better. Finally, I added bit of feathery greens and touches of reds around the water, leaving plenty of the original, high-contrasts areas to fuel the strong and stark effect.

The pastel exhibited in a couple of prestigious shows including the Madden Museum of Art, Denver and at the PACE Center in Parker, CO.

Happily, it has been purchased for a private collection in New Mexico.
Thank you!

Monday, May 14, 2018




Here is something unforgettable - artworks at the bottom of the ocean.
Ken

From Newsweek: Sculptures at the Bottom of the Ocean

The British-Guyanan underwater artist Jason deCaires Taylor is part of a worldwide movement of artists transforming spaces on the seafloor into underwater galleries.
full article




The soft yellow sponge growth dominating the face of this statue survives by pumping and filtering water through its networks of capillary and arteries, referencing the veins and transportations systems of living human anatomy.



To see more of Taylor's work, visit his website
Photo credit: Jason deCaires Taylor


The identical positioning of the figures in a pray like pose aims to highlight a shifting in values and misplaced idealism towards monetary remuneration. Actually one of the easiest sculptures to create it has become one of the most popular and resonated with the public.



Of of Jason's first pieces in Grenada. The piece worked so well in its coral corridor that it inspired the remaining works to be constructed to form the complete sculpture garden.



 A classical still life which is continuously changing and inscribed by prevailing conditions.




The entire installation is comprised of over 450 figurative pieces based on real life models and took over 2 years to construct. The diamond formation is engineered to dissipate strong currents and designed to collect coral polyps after the annual spawning.



At night a divers torch illuminates the true colors of the corals and sponges.


Detail of Brian. The eye area has been colonized by a bright red sponge after around 2 years submersion.


A school of Bar Jacks take refuge from Barracudas within the formation of the "The Silent"




"The Banker" located on 12-foot-deep flat stretch of sand features a internal living space between the legs for crustaceans to breed and inhabit.



Following record high sea temperatures in Mexico algal blooms have formed over the pieces. This in turn is then harvested by local fish species.

end

Monday, May 7, 2018

New Gallery Representation:


left: Brightly Lit Woods pastel $2450.  middle: Red Progressions, oil 48 x 72 $13250.
right: All Over Sunset study pastel  approx. 13 x 18   $2150. 


I am happy to announce my new gallery representation in Santa Fe, NM

Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art
403 Canyon Road, Santa Fe NM 87501  
‭505-983-0062   map  
www.dominiqueboisjoli.com 

They have a large selection of oils as well as some of my pastels and monotypes. The gallery is one of the first you will see on Canyon Road. I hope you will make the trip or contact Dominique or Bob at the gallery for more information.  Some of my works in inventory are shown here. 



left: Orange and Red Woods  36 x 48  $6750    right:  Edge of the Woods, Autumn  36 x 36  $5100.



left:  Yellow with Red Insisting  30 x 40   $5250.    right: Sunset Pond  approx. 9 x 12  $1550.


Monday, April 30, 2018

New Work: Light Diffusing, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches

Light Diffusing, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches  $6650 framed

Typically I'm working with pretty bright colors, but in this oil I purposely greyed down all of the chroma to create a softer image. Parts of the painting still appear to be bright but it's a nice illusion. There are brighter colors in reserve - they are not used here, but more vibrancy can be brought in if needed.

Since the colors are not a full strength, it allows for the delicate purples and blue-greens to play a prominent role here and there, breaking up the line of trees and making this part of the forest more interesting. It's a good strategy for making every color count and creating a softer mood.


Monday, April 23, 2018

New Work: Light Moving Across, oil on canvas 36 x 60 inches

Light Moving Across, oil on canvas 36 x 60 inches  $8450. framed

In this oil I'm revisiting the earlier, square versions of this scene. For this painting the clouds and land masses are softer and the light spreads across the entire canvas in a left to right band. All of that glow is supported with a large variety of colors that add to the drama and movement.

When I'm working on sunset images my goal is to make the entire image interesting with each part yielding something more than the yellow light of the setting sun. It's quite the puzzle because I'm insisting on so many different colors outside of the yellow range.

The eye moves around a lot to take it all in but overall, a sense of calm emerges. It's an interesting balance and it took a lot of moves to make it happen. In the studio other canvases are patiently waiting their turn tomorrow.



Tuesday, April 17, 2018

New Workshop Video: What Really Goes on in Ken Elliott's Fine Art Workshops

Ken talks about his Fine Art Workshops

View the Video

Next workshop: Colorado / May 26-27, 2018
Three spots left




Next Workshop:
Castle Rock, CO  2018
Sat - Sun, May 26-27
Making it Fine Art / Advanced Strategies
2 1/2-Day Workshop with Ken Elliott in his Castle Rock home/studio

$390 per person
Workshop Flyer   Contact Ken

Sat - Sun, 9am-4 pm
Sun evening after break, 4:30 -6, Photoshop Tools

Open to artists in all media.
Contact Ken about possible lodging and transportation arrangements
.
This is a new, advanced version of Ken's Making it Fine Art Workshop. We will be going deeper into making better and more appealing artworks with a variety of strategies and with Photoshop insights made easy.
Limited to 6 artists, $390 each.
Contact Ken

Monday, March 26, 2018

Videos: Bringing Alexander Calder’s Sculptures to Life

“Hanging Spider” (circa 1940)2017 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


Bringing Alexander Calder’s Sculptures to Life

This is a portion of the 2017 article. 


N.Y. Times video / article
By DANIEL MCDERMON
Video by DAMON WINTER
June 26, 2017


ALEXANDER CALDER is famous for having made sculptures that move, but conservators and collectors are cautious about showing them that way. “Calder: Hypermobility,” a new exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, is a rare chance to see several of his works as intended.

To bring them to life, several of the Whitney’s art handlers, who ordinarily work behind the scenes, have been cast into a new role as performers. At scheduled times during the run of the show, a handler will “activate” a sculpture in the gallery with the prod of a gloved finger or the poke of a wooden stick.

Alexander S. C. Rower, a grandson of Calder’s who is president of the Calder Foundation, has trained the crew members to activate the sculptures, a delicate procedure that is, the museum would like to emphasize, only for authorized museum professionals. I spoke to several of the “activators” about their work.

In motion, the sculptures show a different disposition.

“What I understood as the Calder mobile was sort of a passive thing,” said Rob Lomblad, one of the handlers.

And Calder’s signature elements — twisted wire and painted sheet metal — can move in unpredictable ways.

“You’re actually holding something that has this almost spiritual quality to it,” said Tom Kotik, who has been working as a handler at the Whitney for two decades. “Blizzard (Roxbury Flurry)” is one of his favorites. “It does have this playful side to it,” he said, “but then again, you think about it in terms of the cold and the snow, and there’s almost a — I wouldn’t say grittiness, because snow is not gritty — but there’s a yin and a yang.”



Monday, March 19, 2018

Exhibition: Edgar Degas / About the Line

Some thoughts from the Degas show...
The Denver Art Museum is the only venue for this show and it is certainly worth the trip.

Edgar Degas, Passion for Perfection
Through May 20, 2018
 

While I was taking in this great exhibit, I began to notice the strength of Degas' lines and his use of darks to create more interesting works. He pushes those dark values to great effect. 

A great artist like Degas is notable for many things and it is typically the color that receives all the  attention. These works have a lot of presence when viewed in person and part of that success is his use of accenting lines and darker notes.

Degas' work has so many great qualities, but for now, here is a selection of works from the exhibit along that theme.

Also note that many of these works were completed over a span of years. Even for the great Degas, he didn't create the best possible artwork straight through every time.
Ken 




Female Nude Drying Her Hair
Charcoal on tracing paper, 1903 


Four Ballet Dancers
Pastel  1885-90 


Nude Standing Beside a Chair
Charcoal with touches of blue on tracing paper  1990


Standing Woman Fastening Her Corset,
Seen From the Front
Oil  1883

Degas' Studio replicated


The Conversation
Oil  1885-95



The Milliners
Oil  1898


Race Horses at Longchamp
Oil 1871-74


Race Horses at Longchamp  (close up)
Oil 1871-74

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Exhibit: PACE Center, Hand-Pulled: Mark Lunning's Open Press




It's a great honor to be in this show with other remarkable artists. I have 5 monotypes in the exhibit and they look great on the PACE Center steel walls.

Perhaps you can take a look and tour the incredible public space for the arts that has been created in Parker, CO.

Here are the details:

Hand-Pulled: Mark Lunning's Open Press
Artist's reception, Friday March 2, 6pm
PACE Center, Parker, CO
20000 Pikes Peak Ave. Parker, CO 80138 map
Through April 30

A group show highlighting a selection of print makers who have worked with Master Printer and artist Mark Lunning at Open Press:
Patricia Branstead, Dale Chisman, Brian Comber, Patti Cramer, Joellyn Duesberry, Ken Elliott, Joe Higgins, Homare Ikeda, Viviane LeCoutois, Chuck McCoy, Janice McCullaugh, Geoffrey Ridge, and Daniel Teitelbaum. Also featuring recent works by Mark Lunning.

The exhibit was curated by Rose Fredrick, Denver.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Video: Green Dream, oil on panel, 24 x 24 inches


Green Dream, oil on panel, 24 x 24   $2150 unframed
Madelyn Jordan Fine Art, Scarsdale, NY
More about this oil on Ken's blog, For the Color


In this video Ken explains what is behind his 24 x 24 inch oil on panel, Green Dream and the small details that brought it to life.

Video: 2 minutes

Video: At the Ponds Edge, Emerging Spring, oil on canvas, 48 x 60 inches

At the Ponds Edge, Emerging Spring, oil on canvas, 48 x 60 inches

Ken describes how the 4' x 5' oil, At the Ponds Edge, Emerging Spring evolved. This work took about a year to make as it went through a number of changes.

Video: 2 minutes

New Works at the Sorelle Gallery, New Canaan, CT


These five oils just arrived at the Sorelle Gallery in New Canaan, CT.

I want to thank everyone at the gallery for their enthusiasm and the many kindness they have showed me as a new artist there. Thank you!

....hope you will take the time to tour this remarkable gallery online.


LIGHT EFFECTS
Oil on canvas, 36 X 48 inches     $6950 framed
Sorelle Gallery, New Canaan, CT