Sunday, May 20, 2018

Grateful Notices: Brightly Lit Woods, pastel 22 x 22 inches

Brightly Lit Woods, pastel 22 x 22 inches
Purchased from Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM
This work started out as a drawing of a wood with a stark, evening light bathing everything. I was going to fill it in with full foliage but as the drawing progressed, the simplicity prevailed. I put it aside for a very long time - it could have been a year because of the power of it and my lack of any idea to make it better. Finally, I added bit of feathery greens and touches of reds around the water, leaving plenty of the original, high-contrasts areas to fuel the strong and stark effect.

The pastel exhibited in a couple of prestigious shows including the Madden Museum of Art, Denver and at the PACE Center in Parker, CO.

Happily, it has been purchased for a private collection in New Mexico.
Thank you!

Monday, May 14, 2018




Here is something unforgettable - artworks at the bottom of the ocean.
Ken

From Newsweek: Sculptures at the Bottom of the Ocean

The British-Guyanan underwater artist Jason deCaires Taylor is part of a worldwide movement of artists transforming spaces on the seafloor into underwater galleries.
full article




The soft yellow sponge growth dominating the face of this statue survives by pumping and filtering water through its networks of capillary and arteries, referencing the veins and transportations systems of living human anatomy.



To see more of Taylor's work, visit his website
Photo credit: Jason deCaires Taylor


The identical positioning of the figures in a pray like pose aims to highlight a shifting in values and misplaced idealism towards monetary remuneration. Actually one of the easiest sculptures to create it has become one of the most popular and resonated with the public.



Of of Jason's first pieces in Grenada. The piece worked so well in its coral corridor that it inspired the remaining works to be constructed to form the complete sculpture garden.



 A classical still life which is continuously changing and inscribed by prevailing conditions.




The entire installation is comprised of over 450 figurative pieces based on real life models and took over 2 years to construct. The diamond formation is engineered to dissipate strong currents and designed to collect coral polyps after the annual spawning.



At night a divers torch illuminates the true colors of the corals and sponges.


Detail of Brian. The eye area has been colonized by a bright red sponge after around 2 years submersion.


A school of Bar Jacks take refuge from Barracudas within the formation of the "The Silent"




"The Banker" located on 12-foot-deep flat stretch of sand features a internal living space between the legs for crustaceans to breed and inhabit.



Following record high sea temperatures in Mexico algal blooms have formed over the pieces. This in turn is then harvested by local fish species.

end

Monday, May 7, 2018

New Gallery Representation:


left: Brightly Lit Woods pastel $2450.  middle: Red Progressions, oil 48 x 72 $13250.
right: All Over Sunset study pastel  approx. 13 x 18   $2150. 


I am happy to announce my new gallery representation in Santa Fe, NM

Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art
403 Canyon Road, Santa Fe NM 87501  
‭505-983-0062   map  
www.dominiqueboisjoli.com 

They have a large selection of oils as well as some of my pastels and monotypes. The gallery is one of the first you will see on Canyon Road. I hope you will make the trip or contact Dominique or Bob at the gallery for more information.  Some of my works in inventory are shown here. 



left: Orange and Red Woods  36 x 48  $6750    right:  Edge of the Woods, Autumn  36 x 36  $5100.



left:  Yellow with Red Insisting  30 x 40   $5250.    right: Sunset Pond  approx. 9 x 12  $1550.


Monday, April 30, 2018

New Work: Light Diffusing, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches

Light Diffusing, oil on canvas, 40 x 40 inches  $6650 framed

Typically I'm working with pretty bright colors, but in this oil I purposely greyed down all of the chroma to create a softer image. Parts of the painting still appear to be bright but it's a nice illusion. There are brighter colors in reserve - they are not used here, but more vibrancy can be brought in if needed.

Since the colors are not a full strength, it allows for the delicate purples and blue-greens to play a prominent role here and there, breaking up the line of trees and making this part of the forest more interesting. It's a good strategy for making every color count and creating a softer mood.


Monday, April 23, 2018

New Work: Light Moving Across, oil on canvas 36 x 60 inches

Light Moving Across, oil on canvas 36 x 60 inches  $8450. framed

In this oil I'm revisiting the earlier, square versions of this scene. For this painting the clouds and land masses are softer and the light spreads across the entire canvas in a left to right band. All of that glow is supported with a large variety of colors that add to the drama and movement.

When I'm working on sunset images my goal is to make the entire image interesting with each part yielding something more than the yellow light of the setting sun. It's quite the puzzle because I'm insisting on so many different colors outside of the yellow range.

The eye moves around a lot to take it all in but overall, a sense of calm emerges. It's an interesting balance and it took a lot of moves to make it happen. In the studio other canvases are patiently waiting their turn tomorrow.



Tuesday, April 17, 2018

New Workshop Video: What Really Goes on in Ken Elliott's Fine Art Workshops

Ken talks about his Fine Art Workshops

View the Video

Next workshop: Colorado / May 26-27, 2018
Three spots left




Next Workshop:
Castle Rock, CO  2018
Sat - Sun, May 26-27
Making it Fine Art / Advanced Strategies
2 1/2-Day Workshop with Ken Elliott in his Castle Rock home/studio

$390 per person
Workshop Flyer   Contact Ken

Sat - Sun, 9am-4 pm
Sun evening after break, 4:30 -6, Photoshop Tools

Open to artists in all media.
Contact Ken about possible lodging and transportation arrangements
.
This is a new, advanced version of Ken's Making it Fine Art Workshop. We will be going deeper into making better and more appealing artworks with a variety of strategies and with Photoshop insights made easy.
Limited to 6 artists, $390 each.
Contact Ken

Monday, March 26, 2018

Videos: Bringing Alexander Calder’s Sculptures to Life

“Hanging Spider” (circa 1940)2017 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


Bringing Alexander Calder’s Sculptures to Life

This is a portion of the 2017 article. 


N.Y. Times video / article
By DANIEL MCDERMON
Video by DAMON WINTER
June 26, 2017


ALEXANDER CALDER is famous for having made sculptures that move, but conservators and collectors are cautious about showing them that way. “Calder: Hypermobility,” a new exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, is a rare chance to see several of his works as intended.

To bring them to life, several of the Whitney’s art handlers, who ordinarily work behind the scenes, have been cast into a new role as performers. At scheduled times during the run of the show, a handler will “activate” a sculpture in the gallery with the prod of a gloved finger or the poke of a wooden stick.

Alexander S. C. Rower, a grandson of Calder’s who is president of the Calder Foundation, has trained the crew members to activate the sculptures, a delicate procedure that is, the museum would like to emphasize, only for authorized museum professionals. I spoke to several of the “activators” about their work.

In motion, the sculptures show a different disposition.

“What I understood as the Calder mobile was sort of a passive thing,” said Rob Lomblad, one of the handlers.

And Calder’s signature elements — twisted wire and painted sheet metal — can move in unpredictable ways.

“You’re actually holding something that has this almost spiritual quality to it,” said Tom Kotik, who has been working as a handler at the Whitney for two decades. “Blizzard (Roxbury Flurry)” is one of his favorites. “It does have this playful side to it,” he said, “but then again, you think about it in terms of the cold and the snow, and there’s almost a — I wouldn’t say grittiness, because snow is not gritty — but there’s a yin and a yang.”